Video of target dumpster full of ‘brand new’ bikes sparks fury

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An Ohio Target dumpster believed to be full of unused bikes has been filmed, sparking anger over the waste produced by corporate America.

“Bikes, bikes and more bikes,” TikTok user @dumpster_finds said in her viral video, as she waded through a large dumpster that appeared to be jam-packed with items. “New bikes, brand new bikes…it’s a fucking bike in a box.”

“When Target can’t be bothered to donate,” the woman captioned her April 21 clip, which reached nearly 300,000 views. The user has identified herself in other videos as a mother from Ohio looking for hidden treasures in dumpsters like the one at this Target store.

According to its website, Target does not donate merchandise, although it does claim to support local communities through “community engagement funds” and “local store donations” through Target GiftCard donations. The company reported donations of $225 million in 2019.

An Ohio Target dumpster believed to be full of unused bikes has been filmed, sparking anger over the waste produced by corporate America. Above, a Target store in Alexandria, Virginia.
Mark Wilson/Staff/Getty Images North America

The dumpster diver’s video exploded with comments from viewers who were furious at the blatant elimination of bikes that many children and low-income communities would happily use. The comments blasted Target for being “maddening”, “shameful” and “disgusting”.

“I was in a trance watching this over and over again,” one viewer said. “Just sad and amazed at the lack of support from the underprivileged community.”

“The number of kids who might be totally over excited to get one. Whether it’s foster care or poverty,” another stunned comment read.

“Why isn’t Target official in these apologizing comments,” another viewer asked, tagging the company in their comment.

Several others said the dumpster was emblematic of a much larger waste problem in the United States.

“We’re such a disposable nation. They’d rather throw away and get written off than help humanity,” said one despondent commenter.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

  • 27 million tons of plastic ended up in landfills in 2018, or 18.5% of landfill waste in the United States.
  • Clothing also makes up a large proportion of the country’s waste, with landfills receiving 11.3 million tonnes of textile waste in 2018.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports:

  • Food waste is estimated at 30-40% of the food supply, which amounts to around 133 billion pounds every year.
  • Meanwhile, 38.3 million Americans lived in food-insecure households in 2020.

In 2021, 58% of people seeking government services had difficulty receiving at least one service, according to The Associated Press.

Newsweek has contacted @dumpster_finds and Target for comment.

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